Bolivia to Prioritize Occupation of Palestine During UN Security Council Presidency

Sacha Llorenti addresses the Security Council in 2014 wearing the Palestinian keffiyeh, a symbol of resistance.

Sacha Llorenti addresses the Security Council in 2014 wearing the Palestinian keffiyeh, a symbol of resistance. | Photo: Reuters
Bolivia’s ruling Movement for Socialism party has a longstanding history of supporting Palestine’s struggle for liberation.
As Bolivia’s presidency of the U.N. Security Council begins in June, coinciding with 50 years of Israel’s illegal occupation, President Evo Morales announced Monday that the occupation of Palestine will be a priority.
“Our priorities: conflict in the Middle East of 50 years of the occupation of Palestine, and non-proliferation of chemical and nuclear weapons,” Morales tweeted.
In another tweet he said, “We assume with great responsibility the presidency of the U.N. Security Council and we will work for the resolution of international conflicts.”
Bolivia’s Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Sacha Llorenti, will act as president of the Security Council for the month. Llorenti stated that Morales will raise the issue of international peace and security and preventive diplomacy during the first session, which will take place Tuesday, Agencia Boliviana de Informacion reported.
“It is a very high responsibility to chair this body, we want to live up to that responsibility. Bolivia has a very clear voice in the United Nations and fundamentally now that it is part of the Security Council,” Llorenti said last week.
The ambassador also stated that the ongoing situation around the Korean peninsula, as well as Syria will serve as top priorities. The socialist Andean nation is also seeking to bring attention to the ongoing Colombian peace process, as well as the need for foreign aid to Haiti.
Fifty years ago this week, Israel seized the West Bank, East Jerusalem, and the Gaza Strip, as well as the Syrian Golan Heights, and the Egyptian Sinai Peninsula, in a matter of six days. Later dubbed the “The Six Day War,” Israel delivered what came to be known as the “Naksa,” meaning setback or defeat in Arabic, to the armies of neighboring Arab countries, as well as Palestinians who lost all of their land in the conflict.
Bolivia’s ruling Movement for Socialism party has a longstanding history of supporting Palestine’s struggle for liberation.
In February, the Bolivian government called for an end to the Israeli occupation of Palestine at the International Conference in Support of the Palestinian Intifada held in Tehran.
“We call for the recognition of the full, sovereign, free and independent form of the Palestinian State,” said Bolivian Plurinational Legislative Assembly representative Romina Perez Ramos.
In addition, last year, Morales condemned Israel’s policies during his address at the United Nations General Assembly, calling, again, for an end to the occupation of Palestine.
“Israel’s warmongering policies are probably one of the most barbaric examples in the world,” Morales said. “We have to stop the genocide against the Palestinians.”
In 2014, Morales broke diplomatic relations with Israel, calling it a “terrorist state.”
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