Poacher arrested for allegedly killing 8 giraffes in northern Tanzania

Photo taken on April 10, 2016 shows two giraffes in Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania. (Xinhua/Li Sibo)
ARUSHA, Tanzania, July 25 (Xinhua) — Tanzania’s Wildlife Division’s anti-poaching unit (KDU) is holding a suspected poacher for allegedly killing eight giraffes in the northern district of Simanjiro.
Hussein Ibrahim Janjiti(56), a resident of Oljoro 5 in Simanjiro was by Monday noon, in KDU’s custody for interrogation over the killing of the national symbol on Sunday night.
Jesca Riwa, KDU’s acting zonal commander confirmed the arrest and the ongoing interrogation of Janjiti, who is said to be found in possession four motorcycles and some trophies which include Zebra and giraffe meat.
The suspected poacher was also found with torches and four machetes that were used to kill the tall spotted mammals.
The anti-poaching official disclosed that the suspected poacher was in the company of seven other people who managed to escape the KDU’s net.
“We managed to arrest Janjiti and we have since dispatched an anti-poaching intelligence unit to the area to investigate the killings,” she said.
According to Riwa, preliminary investigations were still ongoing over the matter, and that they would issue a comprehensive report once the team finalizes the investigations.
“A team of four men is already on the ground and we will provide full details appertaining to the killing of the eight giraffes,” disclosed the anti-poaching official.
A full report on the giraffes’ killings is due to come out Tuesday, according to Riwa.
Giraffes are routinely killed for their hides and meat, which is sought after in the bush meat trade.
Conservationists say giraffe poaching is now on the rise after their populations on the continent plummeted by 40 percent in the last 15 years.
With its spindly legs, distinctive patterning, and long neck, the giraffe makes a compelling figure on the savannah.
However, the population of the world’s tallest mammal has dropped sharply in recent decades — from about 150,000 in 1985 to fewer than 100,000 today, according to wildlife experts.
Tanzania, which displays the giraffe as its national symbol, is among the poaching hot spots for the tall mammal.

Source

Advertisements